Bringing Nature Home: How You Can Sustain Wildlife with Native Plants by Tallamy, Douglas W.
Douglas W. Tallamy
Books

Bringing Nature Home: How You Can Sustain Wildlife with Native Plants, Updated and Expanded [Paperback] Douglas W. Tallamy and Rick Darke - Paperback


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"A fascinating study of the trees, shrubs, and vines that feed the insects, birds, and other animals in the suburban garden." --The New York Times

As development and habitat destruction accelerate, there are increasing pressures on wildlife populations. In Bringing Nature Home, Douglas W. Tallamy reveals the unbreakable link between native plant species and native wildlife--native insects cannot, or will not, eat alien plants. When native plants disappear, the insects disappear, impoverishing the food source for birds and other animals.

But there is an important and simple step we can all take to help reverse this alarming trend: everyone with access to a patch of earth can make a significant contribution toward sustaining biodiversity by simply choosing native plants. By acting on Douglas Tallamy's practical and achievable recommendations, we can all make a difference.


Author: Douglas W. Tallamy
Publisher: Timber Press (OR)
Published: 04/01/2009
Pages: 360
Binding Type: Paperback
Weight: 1.50lbs
Size: 9.00h x 5.90w x 0.80d
ISBN: 9780881929928

About the Author
Doug Tallamy is a professor in the Department of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Delaware, where he has authored 95 research publications and has taught insect related courses for 39 years. Chief among his research goals is to better understand the many ways insects interact with plants and how such interactions determine the diversity of animal communities. His book Bringing Nature Home was awarded the 2008 Silver Medal by the Garden Writers' Association. The Living Landscape, co-authored with Rick Darke, was published in 2014. Doug's new book Nature's Best Hope will be available February 2020. Among his awards are the Garden Club of America Margaret Douglas Medal for Conservation and the Tom Dodd, Jr. Award of Excellence, and the 2018 AHS B.Y. Morrison Communication Award.